How to Increase Your Trading Profits?

Do You Want Increased Profits? Then Go After Decreased Losses!
Hello, this is Bob Eldridge and I’d like to share with you a frequently overlooked source of profits from your trading. It’s a simple concept yet so very important if you expect to be able to continue trading for any length of time! The concept is that of controlling both the number of losses you have and the dollar amount of those losses. I realize that statement sounds so obvious that you might be tempted to put this article away in favor of a night of bad television, but please stick with me here. I’ll share some things with you that you probably don’t expect to find here!
To better visualize the concept I’m describing, picture a large washtub, the kind you probably remember from your childhood. Now imagine the difficulty of filling the washtub if it has several ‘six-inch’ holes in the bottom! No matter HOW MANY garden hoses you have filling it up, the water is running out faster than it’s going in!! Now imagine plugging each of the holes, one at a time. Plug the first one and the difference is almost imperceptible. Plug the second hole and you begin to notice that there is less water splashing on the ground. Plug the third and you actually may see the water level in the tub begin to rise … just slightly, perhaps, but rise nonetheless! Plug ALL the holes but one and the difference becomes measurable! Now that you’re down to one hole, let’s begin to repair it a piece at a time. First we cover HALF the hole … while the tub still leaks, you can now tell there’s more water going INTO the tub than running out the bottom. Patch half the remaining leak and you begin to adapt to the idea that it’s OKAY if a little water comes out, just as long as there’s more going in than coming out! Continue reading

Margin Trading Dangers Explained with Real Life Cases

Several recent high profile company share price collapses on the Australian Stock Exchange highlight the danger posed to ordinary shareholders from large scale margin trading of shares by directors of listed firms. So dramatic have been the consequences that no equities investor can afford to ignore the lessons.
Significant shareholdings by directors in a listed company have traditionally been viewed favorably as an alignment of executives’ and other private shareholders’ interests, but this ideal can be dramatically compromised in cases where those large shareholdings have been aggregated through, and remain security for, margin loans. Directors leveraging into positions well beyond their capacity to meet margin calls may create a known and acceptable risk for themselves but their actions inescapably also create a significant but hidden and usually unsuspected risk for other shareholders. Continue reading